mutual affection

mutual affection

Our apple trees blossomed about a week ago. The busiest week I have had in the past twenty years. I thought I might miss my chance to photograph them this year. And if we had had any rain or wind I would have. But, alas, they waited for me, the darlings. By tomorrow or the next day these blossoms will be a beautiful carpet of pink covering almost every sidewalk in Minneapolis. I’m glad you waited for me apple blossoms! I do love you so.

crabapple blossoms in May

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scratch and sniff

scratch and sniff

After its typical arrival in fits and starts, spring here in the North is finally filling my senses in all the familiar ways. Crabapple blossoms are lighting the trees on fire, I just caught my first cloud of lilac scent on my walk today, and red winged blackbirds, mallards, geese, and yellowthroats are calling from the cattails. Next up: Sorrel omelet for dinner! It’s May in Minnesota.

lilac flowers (Syringa)

  • Carol says:

    ” i’ll be with you in Apple blossom time, I’ll be with you to change your name to mine…..”

    reply

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on looking past peak expression

on looking past peak expression

When I give photo workshops, I have a section in my lecture that encourages participants to look past the peak expression of a subject. These tulips are a perfect example. I think these tulips are ever bit as interesting and beautiful, maybe even more so, than they were in peak bloom. Often the moments just before, or just after peak expression grab our curiosity more. They make us hesitate. The mind fills in the missing moment of perfection, it extrapolates the bursting bud or the decaying bloom.  I personally find these wabi-sabi images so much more engaging. A fresh alternative to the clichéd image you have seen a million times.

spent tulips

  • Carol says:

    This photo is me, I am having my Wabisabi moment in life. I am not bent over, however.

    reply

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decorate the scaffolding

decorate the scaffolding

I love the trees that blossom in spring before the leaves burst and start competing; magnolias and redbud come to mind. While technically not native to Minnesota, redbuds are more and more common here as our climate changes. From a distance the profusion of pink flowers make it look like any number of spring flowering trees such as crabapples and plums. But on closer inspection, the way the blossoms seem to burst all along the length of the bare branches and even the trunk feels unique and special.

eastern redbud blossoms (Cercis canadensis)

  • Susan L. says:

    Delicate, yet strong!

    reply
  • Carol says:

    This photo is me, I am having my Wabisabi moment in life. I am not bent over however.

    reply
  • Nancy B. says:

    And my daughter and I love those sweet little heart shaped leaves that come after the flowers are done. And the magic of watching those flowers come out of the bark = willy nilly – just for me. When you drive along with me – I smile at the redbuds every time. The pink is like cotton candy of the best kind.

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Jack is back!

Jack is back!

Jack-in-the-pulpit is one of favorite woodland wildflowers. It even graces the back cover of my new book. The are shade-loving native woodland plans. We have hundreds of them that pop up in our wooded property every year. I have captured them in every phase: spring shoots, summer umbrellas, autumn seedheads, and winter stems. This is the first one to capture my attention this spring (I’ve been a little busy.Lol.)

jack-in-the-pulpit shoot in early spring (Arisaema triphyllum)

**For the nerds: The small, inconspicuous flowers of Jack-in-the-pulpit are borne on a fleshy, spike-like inflorescence called a spadix (“Jack“), which is enclosed (or nearly enclosed) by a large, sometimes colorful bract called a spathe (“pulpit“). The flowers are clustered around the base of the spadix inside the spathe. A sterile spadix appendix protrudes from the mouth of the spathe tube. The appendix is covered by the leafy tip of the spathe, referred to as the spathe hood (or spathe lamina). The lip along the mouth of the spathe tube, used as a landing platform for winged insects, is called the spathe flange.

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