same, same, but different

same, same, but different

playing with ice on a white background is tricky. anything white or clear or even pale is tricky on a white background. sometimes i feel like a moth to a flame. the harder the subject, the more difficult the set-up, the more i keep coming back to try it again. and again. an again. that’s either admirable determination, or a brain the size of a moth. sometimes i wonder.

skeleton leaf in melting ice

  • Carol says:

    It’s called curiosity, killed the cat, but satisfaction brought it back. Keep it up, please.

    reply
  • Susan L. says:

    You made me laugh.
    I love all your ice work.
    I’m particularly fond of the one with the acorns.

    reply

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more experimenting

more experimenting

still playing with ice. having fun macgyvering the set-up for these images. not yet sure if i am onto something. time will tell.

acorns and oak leaf in ice

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welcome to february

welcome to february

i was so smitten with my found maple leaf, it made me wonder if i couldn’t have a little fun making photos with ice. this is attempt number #1. the great thing about sun-zero temps is that is only took a short while for my water and river rocks to freeze today. and the great thing about a daily practice is that each day does not have to be perfect. i like this photo. i actually like it a lot. tomorrow i will try again. and perhaps i will create something i love.

river rocks embedded in ice

  • Carol says:

    Love love love this

    reply
  • Ginny says:

    I love it, too. What a brilliant idea! Have fun.

    reply

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b-side

b-side

yesterday’s subject, flipped.

autumn maple leaf caught in ice

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preserved autumn

preserved autumn

in our house, we spend a fair amount of time each year preserving summer’s sunshine for winter: we gather our honey, we can peaches, we make apricot and strawberry jam, we make large batches of pesto and freeze it, and we fill quart-sized freezer  bags with as many tomatoes as we have time to peel. by the time autumn comes around, our freezer is full. so i rarely find myself asking what the season provides in abundance, that we might crave in winter. but if i did stop and consider it, the answer would most probably not be a food, but rather color.  luckily, autumn butts right up against winter, and there is no better preservative than ice. today, i found a tiny bit of preserved autumn. i could almost taste it.

autumn maple leaf in ice

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