time as an artistic medium

time as an artistic medium

When I give workshops, I talk about some of the compositional techniques I use in STILL. I talk about the “hip bump” technique, about using “chance as an artistic medium”, and also about using “time as an artistic medium.”  These three stems are the same coreopsis stems I posted three days ago. I left them exactly where I photographed them, and today they caught my attention anew. Usually, when I use time as my artistic medium, it is more intentional. This time, I must admit, it was simply busyness. Nevertheless, I like these stems, especially in companionship with the original image. A gentle reminder on the fragility of life.

dried coreopsis flower stems

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

definition of a weed

definition of a weed

The definition of a weed is “a wild plant growing where it is not wanted”. Dock is considered a common roadside weed, but because it often stands a good foot or two taller than all the other roadside weeds, it easily visible. Each of those little heart-shaped leaves is actually a flower. In late summer, they start turning various shades of pink, orange, and brown. For this these reasons, its height and its color, I find dock quite fetching. I have only ever photographed dock in autumn or winter. So I thought I would give the summer green version it’s moment in the sun, so to speak. If I like seeing dock along our roadsides, it is a still a weed?

curly dock (Rumex crispus)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

an early molting season

an early molting season

Apparently, our resident geese are molting. This felt unusually early, so I just looked it up it is only a couple weeks early. Birds molt in the summer when there is an abundance of food and mild weather because molting requires a tremendous amount of energy and leaves the birds exposed and vulnerable. As I mentioned earlier, we have two large geese families right now, with teenage goslings. It’s interesting that the parents are molting while raising the meeps. On the one hand, it makes sense because they are more or less grounded anyway as they keep guard of their charges. On the other hand, they have a super important job right now–keeping guard of their charges–so I would think they would want to be in peak physical condition. Clearly, this is a rabbit hole I must go down today!

Canada goose wing feathers 

  • Susan L. says:

    Interesting. We recently found many goose feathers in our yard (midcoast Maine) and wondered if one had been the victim of an eagle or osprey, although there was no sign of violence. Maybe it was another case of molting. Nothing makes sense anymore. Thank goodness we can still count on wine.

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

On impermanence

On impermanence

Sometimes bad things happen to good flowers through no fault of their own. A gentle reminder that life is not fair. It is fragile. And can be cut short at any time. Make the most of very day, reach for the sun, and if you are lucky you may get a chance to bloom.

lanceleaf coreopsis flowers (Coreopsis lanceolata)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

family feuds

family feuds

We have two families of Canada geese making residence in our yard this summer. Both families have goslings–one has 7, the other has 5. The goslings are already in that awkward teenage phase. So ugly-cute it is adorable. The two dads fight like Montagues and Capulets. Mostly they steer clear of each other, but every once in a while one or the other delivers a hissing warning and lands a good swipe. Hence, two lost flight feathers in the grass this morning. Look at that precision engineering!

Canada goose flight feathers (Branta canadensis)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

"/> "/>