rain rain

rain rain

Two days of steady soaking rain and we went from no ferns to shin-high ferns overnight. How I wish I had a time-lapse camera set to capture such rapid growth. I almost wonder if it was audible. Incredible!

fiddlehead ostrich ferns

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Day 4501

Day 4501

I have company in town for my big Book Launch week of events. May 1 is my Pub Day, and we are celebrating with an open house party at a local garden center/farm-to-table restaurant on Wednesday. So, I am entertaining company this week Thus, this now cattywampus patchwork quilt of colorful stems. It has lived on my kitchen floor ever since I made the original squared-up composition several days ago. It has been bumped, and tripped over, enough times now to fully qualify as a new STILL composition. LOL. I’m curious, do you like the straightened up first version or this version better?

quilt of cut stems

  • Old Lady Gardener says:

    The original appeals to my sense of order, this one to my sense of whimsy. On my kitchen floor it would look like a pile of pick-up-sticks by now!
    I’m so loving your book, MJ! Am trying to pace myself, to extend the pleasure of reading it for the first time instead of simply devouring it. It’s difficult!

    reply

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day 4500

day 4500

It’s done. This morning I gave a talk at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts to 200 amazing guests. Wow, the energy in that room. I felt so heard and supported. I also felt so lucky and proud to have a Twin Cities community that would cause a traffic jam over a square mile just in order to attend a beloved art museum event. I felt like shouting, “Skol!” and putting the Minnesota Vikings to shame for a day! In preparation for the talk I calculated how many consecutive images I had made since I started STILL on January 1, 2012. The answer arrived like a sign of something: 4500 images. Even. I figure there’s karma in there somewhere. I was able to tell the audience that I would be going home after the talk to make my 4500th image, and that I already knew what my subject would be, because when I had gone out on the deck at 8 AM this morning to listen to the morning birdsong, I noticed that the deck was littered with hundreds of the small curved red stems of maple blossoms as a result of yesterday’s winds. Et voila! Day 4500. Done. See you tomorrow.

stems from maple tree flowers in april

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Art in Bloom

Art in Bloom

I know, because you tell me, that many of you start your morning by making a coffee or tea and opening up STILL blog. My morning routine is exactly the same. I really like knowing there is loose community of us all doing the the same synchronized steps every morning :-)  But today, I will not be joining you. I will at the Minneapolis Institute of Art preparing to a give talk about my new book to 200 guests. I am the main speaker at the museum’s annual Art in Bloom celebration. Many museums across the country participate in Art in Bloom. In Minneapolis it is wildly popular in part because it usually coincides with are first truly spring-like days after our long winter. Send good vibes! I will stepping onto stage about the time you take your first sip.

assorted dried flower petals

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vincas and violets

vincas and violets

On Saturday morning I will be giving a one hour lecture on my new book (STILL: The Art of Noticing) at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. A few days after that, on May 1, I will be hosting my Pub Day Book Launch party at a local Garden shop and farm-to-table restaurant.  In other words, I am feeling a little under the gun and scattered. All I had time for today was a handful of periwinkles (vincas) and violets from my yard. The two purples place nice together, I think. Oh, how I miss having enough time to arrange them into a composition worthy of their beauty. Soon….soon.

periwinkles (vincas and violets) and violets (Viola)

 

 

  • Carol says:

    Prrfect the way they are thank you very much!

    reply
  • Old Lady Gardener says:

    Two beautiful garden thugs!
    Did you know common violets produce seeds two ways?? In spring they set seed via flowers followed by seed pods – classic! But during the summer months, they produces flower buds that never open (called cleistogamous flowers) but which develop into fruits with fertile seeds. Thus, they are prodigious self-seeders.
    Hope you are able to enjoy all the attention amidst the seeming pandemonium!

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