palourdes migration

palourdes migration

i can’t help but see the exterior shells of these palourdes clams as the barred wings of migrating sparrows. they need to do a little work on their formation. but it does look as if they have clear skies.

palourdes clamshells

  • Pam says:

    Again, bringing a smile to me.

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

spinning or swaying

spinning or swaying

if i look at this image long enough, the leaves start to move, i can’t quite tell if they are spinning along the thread from which they dangle, or if they are swaying in a gentle breeze. i’m going to go look some more. i’ll report back with any new discoveries.

pressed leaves from southern france

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

equilateral

equilateral

what are the three internal angles of an equilateral triangle? well, 60 degrees of course, because they are also equiangular, with all three internal angles congruent to each other, and by definition adding up to 180 degrees. i know this is a hard sell, but math is really so much easier than art.

atlas cedar pinecones

  • Kimbersew says:

    Are they that shape naturally? They would make perfect xmas tree ornaments!

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

early holiday presents

early holiday presents

today i opened one of my husband’s culinary books, which i had used as a plant press, and look what popped out. an entire jurassic scene, complete with ferns, ancient trees, and what may be pterodactyls or proto-herons rising up from a shallow-water marsh somewhere. i clearly need to press more plants. who knows what may be waiting for me under the christmas tree?

pressed botanicals from southern france

  • Pamela Homan says:

    This is most spectacular and makes me smile. I have been doing a similar project for 1 month now and this is the kind of scene I hope to create one day. I also have started pressing the leaves. My images are on my facebook page, Pamela Mendenhall Homan in an album called Fresh Eyes. The album is public. I am so grateful to you for the inspiration.

    reply
  • Dorothea says:

    So lovely … The whole scene and especially the birds (or whatever it may be) rising in the air …

    reply
  • janice says:

    Love this divine assemblage!

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

somewhere between late late fall and early early winter

somewhere between late late fall and early early winter

these are leaves in late autumn, dried and crushed, and so they represent quite accurately “fall color,”  even if we prefer to attribute colors like bright yellow, flame orange, and rust red to the ideal fall color of our nostalgic thoughts. it is still fall here in the languedoc, although it is late fall, and not all the leaves are still clinging to their branches. on the other hand there are trees, like olives and eucalyptus, that keep their leaves all winter long, even though they look like deciduous trees to someone from minnesota. which is a long way of saying that, in week two of december in this very specific corner of france, fall color means these colors. in a week, they will be different. a week ago they were different. this is reason #783 that i love the dailiness of still blog, and hope you do too.

crushed leaves of late autumn in languedoc

  • Ginny says:

    Love STILLblog more than you can imagine. Thank you for such a wonderful daily gift!

    reply
  • Mary Ann B says:

    Amen

    reply
  • janice says:

    I am still in love with STILL!

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

"/> "/>