temporary wall decor

there is a styling trend i have seen on a lot of design blogs using temporary installations of natural objects taped onto walls. these “mood boards” are always taped up using washi tape in the latest trendy color.  even though i have seen it a lot, i still like the look.  it always catches my eye.  here is my attempt at it, without the washi tape (which i think is not in keeping with the STILL blog aesthetic.) the leaves started drooping pretty quickly, but i think it could work as a fun temporary decoration for party.  or better yet, using dried plants and feathers for a more permanent display.

assorted late july botanicals

saint paul, minnesota

 

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house of sticks

wow, little pig #2 must have had much better building skills than i have. my house of sticks lasted exactly as long as it took me to snap a photo and no longer, and there was no huffing and puffing needed to blow it down. which is a shame really, because it took us an hour to create and i was hoping to freshen up my shelf of nature collections with this striking cube.

open box assembled from cherry tree twigs

saint paul, minnesota

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aussie immigrants

the last image in my laguna beach series.  i wish i could have stayed for all four seasons.

eucalyptus leaves

laguna beach, california

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pots, gourds, or gumnuts?

since starting STILL blog, i have become preoccupied with seed pods. so when i saw these beauties in laguna beach last weekend i couldn’t wait to photograph such striking additions to my growing seed pod collection. well, it turns out they are not seed pods at all. they are fruits, and they are called, believe it or not, gumnuts. there appears to be some debate about whether the “gumnut tree” is a form of eucalyptus or its own genus called corymbia. but for the time being it is still common to refer to them as “eucalyptus gumnuts”. which i have now done.

eucalyptus (aka corymbia) gumnuts

laguna beach, california

  • margie says:

    are they edible?

    reply
  • Tracy says:

    Again, the memories are flooding back with each entry you make of Laguna. I remember the incredible smell of the eucalyptus (try spelling THAT quickly on the keyboard!) trees in a cool breeze on the road to the beach. Clears out the cobwebs in the brain. The trees, if I’m not mistaken, are an immigrant from Australia I believe. Unfortunately, their oil is explosive in wildfires, so they’re not appreciated during fire season, but their beauty and majesty are well-loved by many. I remember tossing the “gumnuts” at my sister for revenge, not unlike snowballs here in Michigan.

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  • May says:

    I LOVE your blog!!! I was admiring each image…savoring them almost, imagining the wondrous world of Turtle Lake, Minnesota, so ‘foreign’ to me. When I saw the gumnuts, I almost squealed b/c it was something I recognized and thought we finally had something in common to where I live!! Then, I had to laugh when I saw it was from Laguna Beach. No wonder it was so recognizable…I live in Orange County (Mission Viejo). I love what you do, because, like you, I am compelled to take photos of ‘nature’ at the Oso Creek Trails every time I walk my dog there. It is my little bit of the ‘wild’ in the middle of our city. I’ve never known what to do with all those images over the years. While I may edit them to dramatize patterns, colors or ‘feel’, they remain unprinted and unposted. You are an inspiration.

    reply
    • Hi May. Sometime this February we can talk about the wondrous foreign world of Turtle Lake, Minnesota, and whether you would trade your mundane 70 degree temps for a blanket of snow and 5 below zero! Thanks for taking the time to write such an uplifting message. Who would have thought such an odd bit of nature would connect us? Maybe gumnuts are the secret to world peace.

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catch and release

i just spent four days in southern california visiting a friend who lives in laguna beach.  we visited several of the nearby beaches. i had high hopes of beachcombing for all sorts of STILL blog worthy treasures. but at the entrance to every beach there are now signs that say the beach is a sensitive ecosystem, that no beachcombing is allowed, and the only item you can take away with you is sea glass. i totally admire this. so i used my open journal to lay out a few washed up strands of seaweed and kelp, snapped a quick photo, and then returned the items to their respective homes. everyone was happy.

kelp and seaweed

laguna beach, california

  • margie says:

    that is a really great way to conserve and still let us appreciate the beauty. thx

    reply
  • Tracy says:

    Ahhh, miss Laguna terribly. I was raised not 10 miles from there. Had a painting shown in the Laguna Arts Festival when I was young. I see that beautiful textured sand sticking to your kelp in your photo. Good times and good food!
    Thank you for bringing back great memories.

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    • Hi Tracy, I understand your longing. I have traveled a lot, and found Laguna Beach to be one of the more beautiful places I have visited. The cost of entry is exorbitant, but the setting is unequaled. Lucky you to have grown up with a piece of paradise. That is certainly something to be grateful for!
      Mary Jo

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