a dozen

of all my collections, found eggs accumulate the most slowly, which makes each egg just a little bit precious. they can also be quite hard to identify–the above collection includes song birds, game birds, duck and turtle eggs.

i have been digging into my collections for inspiration because, let’s face it, this time of year in minnesota can be very…well…brown and twiggy. the snow is not quite gone, and what remains is dirty. everything the melting snow exposes is bedraggled and drab.  spring arrives late here. On the other hand, when it arrives, it will arrive quickly.  i can already see the buds starting to swell.

assorted eggs from minnesota and southwest france

 

 

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seedpods

seedpods are one of the STILL blog subjects i keep returning to.  i wish i had taken better care of some of  my specimens.  now several of them have lost their seeds, and that is a little bit of lost magic.

seedpods are technically different from seed-heads, seed clusters, and seeds.  seedpods are several-seeded vessels that split when ripe. they are milkweed pods. they are poppy pods. they are plane tree pods. they are water lotus pods.  they are my current favorite.

assorted specimens from minnesota, california, and southwest france

 

  • margie says:

    seeds are truly one of the most amazing things in nature

    reply

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teenage awkward

the chicks are four weeks old already. they have reached their gawky adolescent stage, with all the goofy curiosity and heedless clumsiness of teenagers anywhere. oh, and did i mention they can fly?  it’s like a bunch of 16 year olds with pilot’s licenses.

golden buff chick at four weeks

saint paul, minnesota

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mordorée

there is a perfect french word, mordorée, that describes the feathers of game birds–a rich caramel color combined with glints of gold. the french use it to describe woodcock feathers, but i think the pheasant wing above fits the description as well. my husband just informed me that pheasants are actually not native to north america.  they were introduced from china in the 19th century.  i guess that makes them naturalized citizens.

male ring-necked pheasant wing

found on highway 95 along the saint croix river

marine on saint croix, minnesota

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double helix

i am entirely delighted by the dark elegance of these two honey locust seed pods.  they look like aerobatic contrails.  or strings of dna.  the precision of poetry. the beauty of science.

honey locust seed pods

saint paul, minnesota

  • doug hassall says:

    Beautiful image! I’m a woodworker and love everything about honey locust. They are beautiful in so many ways. Even the thorns. May I have permission to share this image on my new blog?

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