held together with spit and glue

i was going to try to cut this nest in half to see what a cross section might look like, and then I was going to try to peel it open like an onion. in the end, those both felt too destructive of such a delicate thing, so i contented myself with this little peek inside somebody else’s home. this nest was built with wasp saliva and wood fiber and it hummed all summer long, in an oak overhanging our driveway, as clouds of busy workers clocked in and out.

paper wasp nest from a large oak tree overhanging our driveway

saint paul, minnesota

  • Melissa says:

    The stripes of the nest remind me of the striations of color we see in rock walls, like the Grand Canyon. I wonder if it is built in horizontal layers too. Each layer a different source or worker. 8*)

    reply
  • Melissa says:

    The more I look at it, the more it reminds me of our earth and it’s protective layer of crust around it’s core. Is this nest globe shaped? I have to go google wasp nests! 8*)

    reply
  • Melissa says:

    I’m back!! I found a wonderful video!! You can see the stripes being created at 3 minutes into the video. It is amazing!! Thank you!! 8*)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHfk1EhECaw

    reply
    • Hi Melissa, That is a wonderful video. Thank you so much for sharing the link! And for all your wonderful comments here on STILL blog. Seeing you in the comment list is a day brightener!
      Mary Jo

      reply
      • Melissa says:

        Thank you!! 8*)

        reply
        • Sue Bendlin says:

          What a remarkable and amazing video to actually see the wasps building their home. We don’t have paper wasps in our area so it was especially informative.

          reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

three winter branches

this winter i am noticing more color than usual. i think STILL blog has changed the way i see my winter surroundings. i pay more attention–well, at least to the natural palette around me. but this seems to have come at the expense of my safety behind the wheel, where i have recently endured some embarrassingly close calls. yes, i know, but it’s soooo pretty out there…

merry christmas to all who celebrate it. love and laughter to all who don’t. santa appears to have delivered some identically wrapped, minimal white boxes to our house. time to go see what’s inside!

a collection of colorful winter branches: buckthorn, pin oak, and snow covered spruce

saint paul, minnesota

  • Joanne says:

    merry christmas – and thank you for a beautiful blog again this year!

    reply
  • Margaret says:

    Merry Christmas. Thank you for putting so much beauty into the world.

    reply
  • Melissa says:

    It’s the Friday after Christmas, so Happy Late Christmas!! 8*)

    I recently wandered by your blog and it is indeed a wonderful place!! I agree with the other commenters!! Thank you!! 8*)

    I am wondering if there is something in the air or if it is age that opens our eyes because i have a hard time driving these past few years! My husband says I veer the car when I am looking at something in nature…I just tell him he should drive so I can take photos with my iPad!!! 8*)

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

summer on a stick

I posted an image this summer of queen anne’s lace in all its expansive summer glory.  then i laid the stems on a table in my basement and forgot all about them until this week, when, rummaging for holiday decorations, i discovered a little bit of july preserved on stalks that were still green. green enough, anyway, to remind me that tonight’s -10° F temperatures are only temporary.

dried queen anne’s lace (wild carrot)

saint paul, minnesota

  • Joanne says:

    stunningly beautiful.

    reply
  • Melissa says:

    I was thinking Joanne’s exact words!! 8*)

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 years old

there’s nothing like colorful stones when you’re a ten year old boy. there is a story behind each one of these, and i know because i’ve heard them all several times. some are longer than others. some are more likely to be true than others. if one ever wanted to understand the origins of the tall-tale tradition in american storytelling, one would need only listen to a 10 year old boy with a story to tell, who knows he has the floor.

collection of rocks and semi-precious stones

from beaches and museum gift shops across north america and europe

  • Tammi says:

    I was just showing your images to my 10 year old boy and he agreed with your sentiments above. 10 year old boys do like colorful stones. The purple and blue are his favorites.
    Thanks for the beauty you share here on this site.

    reply
    • What a delightful comment, Tammi, thank you for sharing!

      reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

"/> "/>