scaffolding? or sculpture?

i can’t stop looking at the white tail deer vertebrae we found last weekend.  they manage to look both functional and whimsical.  evolutionary art.

white tail deer vertebra

saint paul,  minnesota

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no more dead birds

i took this photo more than a week ago. the warblers were migrating through, and i assume he hit the glass.  but my family wouldn’t let me post it.  “no more dead birds” they cried.  so i compromised, and waited a week, and here, with my apologies, is another dead bird. there is something about them, their sad and peaceful stillness, that i find both wrenching and beautiful.

tennessee warbler

saint paul, minnesota

  • I put a big paper Ugly Face on my most popular bird strike window in the spring. Seems they can’t see the glass, but they do see the face – no more dead birds. I have enough wren skulls… poor Robins.

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  • Carol Leigh says:

    I threaded some feathers onto thin cording, tied a key onto the bottom, and hung three strands of this in front of the “killer window.” Best solution ever, and it looks rather pretty. The keys weight down the feather strings so that they don’t, on windy days, fly up and lodge in the overhead gutter.

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    • Carol, this sounds much prettier than my Cartoon Frankenstein…!

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  • Kim says:

    It makes me sad, want to cry. But so beautiful. Life=fragile. The little things seem to suffer more. I see horrible things on the highway all the time and would love to document it.

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  • margie says:

    i think you are right to document their tragic beauty

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the virtue of restraint

i love that these dramatic flowers do their elegant thing in the shade of the understory, beneath a parasol of their own leaves.  modesty is in short supply lately, and all the more appreciated for that.

jack-in-the-pulpit

from my yard, saint paul, minnesota

  • margie says:

    i love jack

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a new look at an old friend

not in all my forty nine years, in this northern region where conifers rule, have i taken the time to notice the spring blooms of one of our beloved native residents.  this is the immature male cone of the red pine.  it is often referred to as a “flower” but it is not technically a flower.  it is a strobilus or inflorescence.  to me, it looks a lot like a torch, and the red pine beside the kids’ school was all lit up with them this week.

pollen cone of the red pine

saint paul, minnesota

  • margie says:

    i love those bright colours amongst the evergreens

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what was left

i found this scattering of bones next to a local athletic field during a recent soccer practice. in the car, there were some comments about being the family that brings the deer bones home. the bones are mostly vertebrae and ribs, with one hip joint. they had been picked clean and were beginning to bleach in the sun. i have no idea where the rest of the animal ended up. unable to reconstruct, i did my best to rearrange respectfully.

assorted deer bones

chippewa middle school, saint paul, minnesota

  • margie says:

    i think vertebrae are really some of the most interestingly shaped bones in the body. Thanks for taking the time and effort to photograph them so beautifully

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  • Monika says:

    I love this one too. A few years ago while walking in the woods, we came upon wolf scat and tracks. In some of the scat I found part of a fawn’s jawbone. Amazing.

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