LBMs

everyone in the family has been bitten by the STILL blog bug.  yesterday my husband brought me this trio of LBMs (little brown mushrooms).  he was slowly working his way up the dense green tunnel that is our driveway, cutting back the new growth just enough to keep the approach to our house passable.

i don’t know the name for these fungi.  the irony is that we know more about the mushrooms of languedoc than we do about our own back yard.  we told ourselves we would join the minnesota mycological society when we returned home from france. we missed the big spring event, but hope to join the group in time for the fall hunt.

little brown mushrooms from our driveway

saint paul, minnesota

  • margie says:

    thank him for me

    reply

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summer vacation

we slid into summer vacation mode at our house this week; sleeping on the porch, staying up late, and sleeping in. i love when we get to let the days unfold without a plan.  with one hour blurring into the next, and before you know it we’ve spent four hours on the deck chatting with friends as twilight set in and the fireflies came out. with temps in the 80’s and humidity in the 80’s, we are all moving a little slowly as we acclimate to the high heat of summer.  these cheerful roadside daisies felt like the perfect symbol to mark the beginning of our slowing down into summer.

wild oxeye daisies

saint paul, minnesota

  • margie says:

    i wish i could sleep on the porch. The mosquitoes are just too thirsty.

    reply

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roadsidia  /rōd·sīd·ē·ə/

when i first heard the term roadsidia to refer to the abundance of weeds and wildflowers that grow on the sides of american freeways, i was smitten.  it’s the perfect word.  this spray of grass seeds is an example of roadsidia.  i found it roadside.  a tall weed grass heavy with seeds.  it may be wild oat grass, but i am not at all sure about that.  but i am sure that it belongs to the category roadsidia.

possibly wild oat grass

saint paul, minnesota

  • margie says:

    roadsidea is my favorite source of summer blooms

    reply

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mirror symmetry

i followed a monarch butterfly yesterday to a large patch of milkweed. at first glance what i noticed was the fuzzy new blooms at the center of each tall stalk. but on closer inspection, i was struck by the perfect reflectional symmetry of the alternating leaf layers. i had never noticed it before. and once i saw it, it was all i could see.

milkweed in late june

saint paul, minnesota

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two out of three

we got to watch a mama cardinal build a nest in a small balsam tree beside our deck this spring.  she carefully laid a piece of birch bark on the third highest bough of the head-high tree, then built a careful concave swirl of dried grasses, into which she deposited, on three consecutive days, three brown-mottled bluish eggs. we know all this because our nine year old son gave twice daily reports, after first confirming, each time, that mama was not sitting on the eggs and would not be disturbed by his investigations. two of the three eggs successfully hatched and fledged.  to our sadness but also, if i am to be honest, to my slightly abashed joy, one of the three eggs did not hatch. mama has long since abandoned the nest, and the world is poorer by one cardinal, and richer by one image of a beautiful  brown-mottled bluish egg.

cardinal egg

saint paul, minnesota

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