my languedoc

part of what i love about having to make a still blog photo every day (i don’t always love every part of it) is that it forces me to stay in touch with the seasons wherever i happen to be. not everyone who has spent time in southern france would be able to pinpoint the month of the year this was photographed. but i can look at it and know immediately that that is late september or early october in the languedoc. and i feel as if i am somehow more a part of things for knowing this. i’m looking out from inside the country, not shading my eyes and staring in from the outside.

figs, fennel, and grapes

autignac, france

  • Candice says:

    Please don’t EVER stop this blog!

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saffron’s cousin

these two crocuses overlooked a fall vineyard, post-harvest, and an olive grove, not to mention the grounds of ch√Ęteau coujan, where the grapes would be made into wine, and the olives into oil. we might all be as cheery as a yellow crocus, if we had been planted in such soil.

wild crocus

coujan, languedoc, france

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holding on

i love the simultaneous sense of neediness and entitlement these vine tendrils give off as they grip the stems of plants around them. like a child on your hip, holding on tight, secure in the knowledge that she deserves all of your comfort and attention.

grape vine with tendrils

autignac, france

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party time!

one of the continuing delights of living in this strange corner of france is the prevalence of forgotten corners, and hedgerows, and abandoned gardens, where forgotten plants thrive that are either edible or uncommonly beautiful. this post-bloom iris was found behind a wooden plank against the stone wall of a neighbor’s house. it had hidden in the shadows for too long. i decided it deserved to celebrate its own beauty with an effervescent explosion of cherry red seeds. i hope you will give it a hand, well-earned, and long-deferred.

iris foetidissima (stinking iris fruits)

chateau pastre, autignac, france

  • Cyndee says:

    Thank you…it’s my birthday and your iris does look like a celebration…I’m glad it was found and brought out to the light.

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  • Susan says:

    Your work delights me. Thanks so much for sharing what you do on this blog!

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  • I saw your photo on IG and had to know more. What amazingly beautiful seeds and the colour contrast is wonderful.

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jigsaw puzzle

i’ve been trying to figure out where still blog goes, when it’s time to change direction. at the end of this year, it will have been 5 years of still blog against at white background every day. that is a kind of tradition, but also a kind of stagnation if it remains the same indefinitely. i am putting the pieces together slowly. i don’t have the puzzle completed. but there are fewer loose pieces than there were six months ago. stay tuned.

white poplar leaves (populus alba)

autignac, france

  • Whatever you come up with will be grand! Love following along on your journey!

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  • Dede says:

    Agree with @thegothamgirl. The inspiration you give me on a daily basis has made such an impact. Can’t wait to see where this take all of us: thank you MaryJo!

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  • lindsey says:

    I will not be mad if you leave it on a white background. Keeping with tradition is underrated; however, your classic + sophisticated taste will brew up something lovely no matter the change! enjoy following along all of your nature journeys.

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  • margie says:

    such a gorgeous image of curled leaves and i am excited to see where still blog will go in the next year

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