noblesse oblige

i got outside today to do a little spring clean up in the yard. and look what i found hiding under the oak leaves. i am glad they were hiding, otherwise i’m sure the deer would have found them. last fall i planted 300 daffodil bulbs, and last week i watched out my kitchen window as seven deer feasted on my shoots as if they were at an all-you-can-eat salad bar.  i think the deer are as beautiful as the daffodils, so i leaned on my kitchen counter and watched them eat. this is glimmer’s house, after all.  and jack the puggle’s. the tail wags the dog around here. and the fluffy butt rules the roost.

crocuses (crocus vemus?)

saint paul, minnesota

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you choose

when people ask me what my criteria are for choosing my photos, i say “it must either be beautiful or interesting. or both”. it is a bonus, of course, if it is both.

this is a photo of honeycomb built by overzealous bees and scraped from the sides of their frames. when their frames get fully built out, the bees will just keep going, wrapping their comb around the edges of the frames. when the u of m comes out to check the health of our colonies, they need to scrape this extra comb off so they can pull the frames out and inspect them. the older the honeycomb, the darker it gets…

so: pretty or interesting? or both?

honeycomb

saint paul, minnesota

  • celia says:

    Both. Definitely both.

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  • Lisa says:

    I say both.

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birthday bouquet

so i am throwing away the remains of an enormous 80th birthday bouquet my mother gifted to me prior to her two-week vacation in florida. i think to myself  “i like these spent stems. i think i’ll use them for still blog today.” then my twelve year old son wanders by and says “mom, it’s spring outside. why are you taking a winter photo?” and i panic. he’s right. spring happens so fast at this latitude. in one more week it will look and feel like summer already. and all those delicate new-growth colors–those colors that are expressing themselves right now, as we speak–will have turned into the monochromatic grass green of summer. i know i can’t even begin to capture it all. why am i squandering an entire spring day’s STILL blog shoot with dying cut flowers? joe is absolutely right. he is such a wise and perceptive kid. i should probably acknowledge this. i turn to him. and i say, joe: ‘go outside and play.’

remnants of my mother’s 80th birthday bouquet

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what are your identifying features?

that pile of downy fluff could belong to any of a number of birds. but those white tipped blue feathers only belong to one animal. it has got me thinking, what is my identifying feature? for my gorgeous friend talin it is definitely her eyebrows. for my friend kristin, it is her brown-haired/blue-eyed combo. for my son joseph, it is the cleft in his chin he inherited from his grandpa (my dad). when i was younger, i would have said it was my turned up nose. the neighbors–the parents mind you, not the kids–used to tease me saying i “would drown if i went out in the rain”. today, my identifying feature would probably be the dark circle under my eyes i also inherited from my romanian father. thanks dad! good thing i had all that practice coping with a pug nose as a kid, because raccoon eyes are way worse.

mallard feathers

vadnais lake trail, saint paul, minnesota

  • Carol says:

    From the few photos I have seen of you, you are simply adorable in every way and I think your sparkle makes you unique

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framed

an interviewer recently asked me what the best piece of advice i ever received was. i couldn’t decide. it was either, “be careful what you’re good at,” or “ask forgiveness, not permission,” or “do good work and put it where people can see it.” tell me yours. i’ll frame it in forsythia.

forsythia

saint paul, minnesota

  • speak soft and takes a good stick (in sense figurative, of course)

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  • Anne Lloyd says:

    Practicality is making the best of a situation. Ingenuity is turning it around.

    Author unknown. Found this on a card in the late 1970s, and tried to keep it as a reminder ever since.

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  • Dede says:

    The real generosity toward the future lies in giving all to the present.

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  • Ann says:

    Progress can’t come from simply breaking down the ideas of others. It comes from listening and offering better solutions.

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  • Erica says:

    “Es ist nicht genug, zu wissen, man muß auch anwenden; es ist nicht genug zu wollen, man muß auch tun.” – Goethe. Or as Mark likes to remind the kids (daily): Knowing and doing are two different things.

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  • Sarah says:

    “Take advantage of every unfair advantage you’re given.”

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  • Nielz says:

    „Mach es sofort!“
    „Do it instantly!“
    Works super for things like „Nah, will put that stuff away later“ or „I’ll take it out next time i go to the garbage“

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