new era(s)

the end of two eras happened on two consecutive days. yesterday we said goodbye to our daughter eva at the barcelona airport, and, a little wet-eyed, watched her thread her way through the security line, on her way to california for the first semester of her freshman year of college. today, my younger son became a teenager. for his birthday dinner, after a month in france, he chose a hamburger and fries. we ate them together on the terrace, a family of three for the first time in 13 years. can somebody please make the clock stop for just a couple of days? i need a breather.

lonicera implexa (honeysuckle)

found along a road between the vines, laurens, languedoc, france

  • Mary Ann says:

    I can imagine how your heart is feeling. Where does this thing called ‘time’ go so quickly? What I wouldn’t give to go back and re-live a few chosen weeks of my life. Time when my children were little ones. Grasp hold of all of it and hold on tight. xo

    ps–love the unique plant, a lot…

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  • Lusty says:

    Could be some type of lonicera (honeysuckle), maybe Lonicera implexa? http://floressilvestresdelmediterraneo.blogspot.com/2013/09/caprifoliaceae-lonicera-implexa.html

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    • Oh my! That is exactly what it is! Thank you so much! I had started to search for the name, but was even getting close. Lovely!
      Mary Jo

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eyebrows

some plucking is in order here. pun intended.

unidentified little black feathers

 

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  • Mary Ann says:

    Big Smiles!!
    xo

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slugged

at 7:30 in the morning, on the upper reaches of the orb river, my two boys slipped into the water to go hunting for trout, and i stood on the bank, while the slugs hunted me. there were perhaps two score of them, moving slowly enough that it was easy to imagine them all converging in my direction. but i am a tomboy, and my first thought was not to run away from the slow motion horror show, but to pry a few of them off of the grass, and photograph them against a white background. i understand that that is both a little bit badass, and a little bit weird. i am happy to own both adjectives.

slugs (les limaces)

orb river, bouscet d’ord, languedoc, france

  • Mary Ann says:

    Good for you, Mary Jo!! I hope you own it all as completely as you can–in whatever way you choose.
    xo

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  • Candice says:

    I love this blog!

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  • erica says:

    The succulent sliminess of the slugs seems so incompatible with the dead (or dormant) wild thyme of the previous pic. (pardon the unintended, excessive alliteration)

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dead? or dormant?

the drought here hit home today when we drove up into one of our favorite vineyards for a sunset aperitif. the grapes on most of the vines, only a week away from harvest, were little sweet peas, or chick peas, when they should have been marbles by now, or even, well, grapes. but the real devastation occurred as we pulled up to steve’s secret stash. there is a shallow hillside next to an obscure gravel road, that is usually carpeted with sage colored wild thyme. most years we make our pilgrimage and steve carefully digs up one of the plants in order to add it to the potted herb garden he keeps on our terrace. this year, however, it was as if a favorite forest had been leveled by a wildfire. the entire hillside was ghostly with dried, brittle thyme branches. not a single sage colored triangular leaf in sight. he ceremonially dug one of them up anyway, and i took a picture of it, before he placed it in a pan of water, and began monitoring it like an invalid. we will see whether his nursing reveals the plant to be dead, or merely sleeping through this year, in hopes of more rain in 2017.

wild thyme

laurens, languedoc, france

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  • Mary Ann says:

    This made me feel sad. We are putting our Dear Cat, Willie, to sleep today for his final rest. Reading your words made me think deeper about death. All living things must come to an end. I am hoping that your Wild Thyme finds it’s way back to life. xo

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    • Mary Ann, I am so sorry to hear about Willie. We had two cat who live to be 19, and 20 years old. They died seven years ago and we still talk about hem regularly. so I share your sorrow. But usually when we bring them up now it is to tell a funny story and we all laugh. So, trust that your grief will one day turn into joyful gratitude. With sympathy, Mary Jo

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  • Mary Ann says:

    Thank you for your kind and heartfelt words, Mary Jo. Our Vet thought we should try a steroid for a week and see what happens. How incredible that your cats lived to be 19 and 20. That was a gift. xo

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