food photography is hard

food photography is hard

my stretch goal for in 2018 was is to add the occasional food photo, but do it in a STILL blog style. i thought it would be pretty straightforward–just treat the food as i would a nature specimen. isolate it on a white background. pick an angle that emphasizes some aspect of the subject, either the graphic form, or the natural beauty, or the ingenious design. all my usual tricks. but it is proving to be so much harder than that. i can’t tell yet why that is so. perhaps we are all too familiar with food products? or maybe it’s that there is so much food photography out there that it’s really hard to do anything new? i don’t know. anyway, i am struggling. in a good way. i feel challenged. i’m excited for the local growing season to start so i can start getting better subject materials. it is good to feel like an amateur again.

peeled granny smith apple

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whatever makes you smile

whatever makes you smile

a few months ago i read the book a gentleman in moscow by amor towles.  i have mentioned before how much i liked the book.  but i was reminded of it again today as i waited in line at my local post office. in the book, towles uses the expression ‘potted palm’ repeatedly. and every time he did, it made me smile. i can’t explain why, perhaps the alliteration, or perhaps a subconscious association of potted palms with gentile settings in tropical climates. whatever it was, it made me smile. so today, while waiting my turn at the post office, i eyed two large and mostly ignored potted palms at the end of a corridor. potted palms! i thought. i don’t know if stealing a potted palm leaf from the post office constitutes a felony theft of government property but if so, i am newly a felon. but a felon who has just given herself the opportunity to use the phrase “potted palms” half a dozen times, and who is smiling.

schefflera leaf (australian ivy palm)

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too pretty

too pretty

it’s possible to be too pretty. i have watched the struggles of some friends who were so pretty that they were eventually defined by their beauty, and couldn’t escape it to be something other than beautiful. i think of this ranunculus a little bit like that. this is my first photo of this species. i guess i have always just assumed that it gets photographed to death because it is so beautiful that the sight of it almost catches in your throat. after six years of daily STILL blog photos, here is my first encounter with ranunculus, a flower that now reminds me of the pretty girl in high school who never gets asked to prom, because everyone assumes someone else has, surely, already asked her. will you be my date, ranunculus? i think you’re pretty great.

ranunculus

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eat the rainbow

eat the rainbow

my brother in law says he spent most of his adolescence on an orange diet. orange as in the color orange. the diet was mainly made up of cheez-wiz, orange fanta, and cheetos, with some kraft mac n’ cheese and cheez-its thrown in for their extra health benefits. i’ve heard that if you just eat the rainbow, taking in nutrients from foods with the widest possible variety of colors, your diet pretty much takes care of itself. but i’m not sure the inventor of “eat the rainbow” spent enough time accounting for the existence of starburst. or dots. or skittles. mmmmm . . . a skittles rainbow . . .

star fruit, pears, limes, apples, lemons, grapefruit, persimmon, oranges, pomegranate, blackberries, cranberries and various dried leaves

  • Ginny says:

    …and then she had fruit salad while she vacuumed up the leaf confetti! This is beautiful!

    reply

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so much to learn

so much to learn

i know my native wildflowers and weeds a whole lot better than i know my common florist botanicals. i’m pretty certain these are hellebore flowers. but it took a long while on google and wiki for me to come to that conclusion. and i never did find an example with dark stems like these. i am sure some of you who live in warmer climates than minnesota probably readily recognize these demure beauties. anyone want to chime in and help a gal out? any good stories about these strangers that might help me get to know them better?

pale green hellebores (?)

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