pick three things

pick three things

eight years ago our family fell  in love with a tiny village in a forgotten rural corner of languedoc in southern france (my long time followers will know all about this). ever since, we have been going back and forth as often as we can, spending anywhere from two weeks to six months in an unfashionable, slightly impoverished corner of mediterranean france. earlier this year, my husband sneaked off for a quick writing-related visit, and he came back with these three pieces of contraband, slipped through customs, that happen to be a three-part sensual distillation of that part of the world for us: wild fennel, wild thyme, and lavender. in the north woods of minnesota it would probably be cedar, balsam, and spruce. i’m so curious: what are your three primal plants that define where you are from?

wild fennel, wild thyme, and wild lavender from autignac, france

  • Charmian McLellan says:

    Sagebrush, aspen, pine, juniper. I cheated. That’s four!

    reply
    • Thanks for cheating. It made me smile. I can smell the sagebrush and juniper from here.

      reply
  • Carol says:

    Teasels, skunk cabbage and early spring violets

    reply
    • I looked up skunk cabbage this morning thanks to you. Apparently we have it here in Minnesota, and I can’t believe I’ve never seen it!!!

      reply
  • Eva Paulson says:

    Birch, lilacs and forget-me-nots

    reply
  • Kimbersew says:

    White pine, high-bush blueberry, goldenrod

    reply
    • That’s an awesome list. By the way, I’m curious, in Minnesota we have a highbush kind of blueberry-like berry we call Juneberry. Is that the same thing?

      reply
  • Kimbersew says:

    hmm- Here we have a beautiful asymmetrical skinny tree called Juneberry/ shadbush (blossoms when the shad run)/ serviceberry (the funeral services could be held when the ground thawed [fascinating!]) But our wild high-bush blueberries are small-berried (quarter inch or smaller) grow too tall to reach the top berries, typical blueberry crown opposite the stem end, no seeds to work around, bloom in late spring, bear fruit in early summer, ripe in July. Loved by birds and bears and dogs and humans alike. Come visit!

    reply
  • Nicole E. says:

    Sea Oats, Adam’s Needle (yucca), American beautyberry. I’m not very familiar with plant names – so I googled my local coastal NC native species…and picked the ones I see most often and find the most intriguing or give me the most pause.

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

antennae

antennae

some of you may be old enough to remember when we got our television signals by putting big aerial antennae on our roofs that pulled in tv signals and sent them via coaxial cable to our large (21 inch!) console televisions made by companies named sylvania, rca, and zenith. the antennae looked very much like the spurs at the end of these oak (i think) branches. one of the best decisions i’ve made in 54 years on this planet, was to get rid of our tv about 14 years ago, and to trade antennae pulling in tv signals, to antennae pulling in sunlight.

bare (oak?) branches against a white sky

  • Ginny says:

    Yup! An excellent decision to ditch the tv! Ten years for me and I haven’t missed it a bit (and most folks don’t seem to comprehend this decision). Beautiful branches.

    reply
    • The next challenge is the iPhone and the internet. I don’t know what to do about them, because some of these relationships feel so rewarding–so much more so than TV sitcoms with laugh track.

      reply
  • Rosalind says:

    I am a relative newcomer to your blog (discovered through the hello sunshine site). So many days your images take my breath away—this one included. Thank you for inspiring awe and appreciation for the simple beauties in this life.

    reply
    • Oh, you make me happy, Rosalind. Thank you. This kind of connection is why I started this blog. Welcome.

      reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

fireworks the STILL way

fireworks the STILL way

we have lots of new visitors here at our quiet little corner of the internet lately, since better homes and gardens featured my home in their november issue. for those of you new to STILL, let me first say “welcome!” today’s organic fireworks are for you.  you might have been expecting a halloween related image, but seasonal holidays only occasionally find their way onto STILL blog (just managing expectations here.) i make a STILL blog image every day, and have been doing that for the past 6 years, going on 7. the truth is, i often don’t know what day of the week it is, and holidays have a habit of sneaking up on me and catching me by surprise. certainly i will never keep you current on current events. but if you’d like to start your day by looking at one thing at a time, gathered from nature, and usually arranged in a way that i hope makes you want to linger for an extra second or two. if you want to spend a little time in a place where the only noise is silently exploding alliums, then welcome home.

allium in late ocotober

  • Eva Paulson says:

    This a delight. The simplicity and beauty of nature astounds me everyday. I did read about you in BH&G and am such a fan already!

    reply
    • I’m so glad you found your way here. And you couldn’t have said it better when it comes to the simplicity and beauty of nature. Bravo.

      reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

because

because

i took a lot of photos two days ago. the light on the lake was perfect. i was awake early. it was a white overcast sky. my son was fishing and there was fog on the lake. i probably took 15 photos worthy of STILL blog. but i showed them all to my family, scrolling forward and backward, and everyone picked this one as their favorite. why? i don’t know. it’s not pretty. it’s not complex. it doesn’t invite reflection. it isn’t engaged in a dialogue with the history of western art. it just . . . works? i don’t know. i think i agree with my family, but i don’t know why. i think the reason is . . . because.

white oak branch with leaf

  • Jordan says:

    Your photos and captions are amazing. I loved reading about your work in BH&G and have been mezmoeized since. Catching up on 6 years of Stills will take a while but has already proven to be so enjoyable.

    reply
    • Please press on! And then stay with me for another 6 years!

      reply
  • Tim says:

    Maybe because it could never be replicated?

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

organic and graphic

organic and graphic

yesterday we had a morning fog that was so thick it didn’t burn off until mid afternoon. it was splendid. like a giant light box. the perfect conditions for me to photograph everything and anything i wanted to against a soft white sky. look at the mottled colors of those birch leaves. look at their varying and similar shapes. look at the long bud spurs alternating along the black twigs. look at the shapes of the white spaces between all of them. look at the effect of the whole, and then look at whatever detail catches your eye. look.

paper birch branches with autumn leaves

  • Carol says:

    I see a little bird foot in the upper left corner

    reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

"/> "/>