looking one’s age

nobody here looks as old as they actually are. if you see someone who looks 65, you should assume he or she is probably 70-plus, if not 75 years old. there’s an 84 year old ex police officer up the street who takes a bike ride every day down the hill to check his garden and then climbs back up again. all i’m saying is, i have seen the people here, and i have seen the vines. and i am starting to suspect that we have a “picture of dorian gray” situation going on. out in the fields, the vines just keep looking older and older, and the villagers eat cheese and drink wine and never age.

grape vine stump

autignac, france

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anatomy lessons

i spent more than an hour trying to identify the fruit of this climbing vine. it turns out it is a kind of fig. with the sense of triumph of that only a scientist can feel at the successful identification of a species, i turned to my husband and said, “look! it’s a ficus pumila!!” he leaned down for a closer peek, and said, “look! it’s a uterus and a vagina!” we really do see eye to eye most of the time. but testosterone is testosterone.

ficus pumila, creeping fig

autignac, france

  • Brigitte Fisher says:

    Loving the black background!

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  • Betsy says:

    This are absolutely stunning!!

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close parenthesis

i could have oriented this semicircle to either the left or right. it seemed fitting to turn it left, like a close parenthesis, since we are steadily making our way toward the period at the end of the sentence of this latest stay in the languedoc. the first round of goodbyes started yesterday, and will take on increasing momentum until our departure in 10 days. some of our friends will insist on multiple goodbye apéros. just like the three-cheek greetings, it seems our departure calls for three-apéro goodbyes.  this is our fourth visit to this tiny, rural village. and it was during our second trip that the villagers very subtly switched from saying “will you come back?” to “when will you come back?”. there is no real doubt in anyone’s mind that we will come back someday, likely sooner than later. so, the close-parenthesis may be a little melodramatic. but given how emotional i’m feeling about leaving this sane and quiet place, and returning to post-obama america, i think you should congratulate me on my restraint.

succulents from our terrace

autignac, france

  • cecelia says:

    i love this!! it reminds me of a squash blossom turquoise necklace. just lovely.

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  • cecelia says:

    I love this! it reminds me of a squash blossom turquoise necklace. just lovely.

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  • sara says:

    I have enjoyed STILL for quite some time. It is one of the ways I begin my day–sort of a visual centering. But I am truly enjoying this new side of it. These images set against a dark background are just as visually moving, but they hit me in an entirely different way. I particularly love this one, but all have been beautiful. Thanks, too, for sharing stories and images of your time in France. It’s made this Midwestern girl’s winter far less dreary.

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    • Aww, Sara, you make me blush. Those are such kind words. Thank you so much.

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scurrying to prepare for winter

we are starting to prepare for our return home. we have two weeks left. i know for most people, that sounds like a nice long vacation. but, i am feeling nothing but time running out. i have a house full of nature finds, and enough paper scraps from my collage work that i may need to hire a dumpster. i am heading back to sub-zero (fahrenheit mind you) weather, and a landscape covered in two feet of snow. i have done five winters of STILL images, so i shouldn’t be anxious. but, let’s face it, bare winter stems on a white background looks minimal and artsy. on a black background, it will be tricky. very tricky. so, like a squirrel preparing for winter, i am scurrying around and photographing everything i see on my new black tagboard. these geraniums grow in pots that line our terrace here in autignac. they are still blooming in january. which is a reason to be joyful about living here right now. and another reason to feel panicky about the approach of our departure date. there are no geraniums in minnesota right now.

geraniums

autignac, france

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these are a few of my favorite things

whew. launch days, or in this case, re-launch days, always make me a little nervous. so many last minute loose ends and last minute tweaks. i always end up with a lot of nervous energy, and not a lot to do but monitor for hiccups.  all in all, yesterday went pretty smoothly. just one little glitch with pinterest that i am hopeful we will shortly smooth out. otherwise, a successful relaunch day. you all were so loving and encouraging. i really appreciate it more than you can possibly know. i did get a few mourners who will miss the white, but even that was a tribute of sorts to five years of dedicated work. so, one great big huge mediterranean three-cheek kiss (the special-occasion kind) to all of you! you make this labor of love so much about love and so little about labor. thank you.

an assemblage of some of my favorite languedocien collections

autignac, france

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