malvidin

malvidin is responsible for the blue color found in this geranium. it is also responsible primarily for the color of red wine. which makes it doubly beautiful to me.

“johnson’s blue” geranium

 

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exotically  common

exotically  common

my husband (@sjrhoffman) is a food writer. he was recently consulted about the southern French ritual of drinking pastis, the anise flavored drink that is ubiquitous in hot mediterranean cultures. his reply to the editor got me thinking about wild fennel (which is a big part of how most pastis is flavored) and how it grows wild on almost every summer roadside in the midi, and how it used to whip at my elbow if i rested my arm on the open car window sill. for me, more than tomatoes, more than anchovies, more than garlic, more even than lavender, wild fennel is the beating heart of southern france.

wild fennel with land snails

languedoc, france

  • Kimbersew says:

    Ahhh…. those snail know the delight of wild and slow food. One sip at a time.

    reply

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the broken one

the broken one

here, as with the delicate members of our own species, the broken one calls for our attention.

shelling peas

st. croix valley, minnesota

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a twisted bouquet

a twisted bouquet

this arrangement created itself.  a feral morning glory wrapped itself around a shaft of timothy grass, and forced some crown vetch to join the menage. it all got very twisted.

tangle of roadside plants

saint paul, minnesota

  • Carol Sommers says:

    Menage a tois

    reply

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about time

about time

ok it’s midsummer, and you’ve gotten a lot of flowers and blossoms and intriguingly postured stems over the last few weeks. but STILL blog isn’t just about beautiful things. it’s about nature, and nature isn’t always beautiful. unless you consider a mudstained raccoon scull with two remaining molars beautiful. which i do.

unidentified mammal skull (probably raccoon)

mississippi river flats, saint paul, minnesota

 

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