love spell

love spell

among other things, apparently a “holey,” or “hagstone” (a stone with a naturally created hole in it) represents the sacred vagina of the great goddess. if the internet is correct, it seems i can stick a small, precisely fitting twig into one of these “holeys,” (imitating an act not generally associated with sticks and stones), and then i can throw the resulting coupled bit of nature into the sea, in order to create a very powerful love spell. true love, apparently will come to me sometime afterwards. i’m not sure quite how to proceed, since true love has already come to me, and we have spent the last 28 years together. what if i toss a twig-impaled hagstone into the sea, and the universe sends me a “true love,” wearing dockers and a golf cap, who quotes lines from Happy Gilmore, and wants to tell me about his awesome last trip to vegas? no, i think i’ll store these hagstones chastely in a box in my basement, where they can do whatever they want with their sacred vaginas.

hag stones

mediterranean beach near sète, france

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a very specific kind of nightmare

a very specific kind of nightmare

these angelica stems (or should I say “trunks”) lined the bank of a trout stream that my two boys (husband and son) were fishing last week. angelica can reach nine feet tall and might be the tallest wildflower in minnesota. when i asked the boys to cut two or three of the striking plants down for me, they fell into long laments about the nightmarish flower heads, which seem to come alive behind a fisherman’s back and reach out to grab his back-cast, and then wrap his line in tangled balls around their stems. apparently an artist’s graphically beautiful silhouette, is a fisherman’s treacherous nightmare. who knew.

angelica (Angelica atropurpurea)

river falls, wisconsin

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caught between

caught between

not quite ready to let the kids go back to school, and yet totally ready for quiet and the resumption of a routine. not yet ready for cold weather but ready for the end of the really hot weather. sort of ready for fall. sort of still in summer. exactly like these leaves.

unidentified prairie leaves

wisconsin

 

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autumn feast

autumn feast

i used to see goldenrod and think “allergies.” but now i see goldenrod and think, “bees.” specifically, the friendly gatherings of honeybees and bumblebees and hoverflies that swarm over the fuzzy heads of goldenrod in the fall, and make, if you’re lucky, some dark and pungent honey to drizzle in your herbal tea all winter long.

goldenrod (solidago)

shoreview, minnesota

  • Susan L. says:

    I love how your photos make every separate subject seem like the most significant thing on earth. So lovely.

    reply

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royal purple

royal purple

the reason purple is associated with royalty is that purple dye could originally only be made from a tiny mollusc that was only found off the coast of lebanon. a purple garment at some points in history was literally worth its weight in gold. i wonder how medieval royalty would have responded to the sight of a field full of bull thistle.

bull thistle

river falls, wisconsin

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