teenage spirit

teenage spirit

these tulips were on my kitchen counter in this arrangement. i simply slid a piece of paper under them and took a photo. when my son saw me editing the photo just now, he said “no. just no.” (he often offers unsolicited feedback these days. he’s 14.) a little surprised, i asked him why not. “because it looks like you are trying to look like a moody aspiring photographer”, he said. so there you have it. possibly a tumble of wilting tulips displaying graphic arcs and fleshy but newly wilting petal heads. or possibly a totally pretentious and empty flirtation with the moody dark side of still life. thank heavens for the teenagers these days. they march on washington. they tell the truth. they give no quarter. they might just change the world.

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syrup season

syrup season

maple syrup season is mostly behind us here. we sometimes tap our big sugar maple in the back yard, but this winter was just a little bit too action-packed to make time for the long process of tapping and boiling. when we first started researching how to do it, and which trees to tap, we learned that box elders also make sap, and therefore syrup, though a little less sweet than maple sap. we later discovered that was because box elder is a variety of maple. and so when i was trying to identify these very maple looking seeds that i knew were not maple, i had to think for a minute before i could remember which tree it was that also made syrup and was sort of a maple but not called a maple. it took my 50 year old menopause brain a little bit of creaky exploring through its own obscure corners. but it came up with box elder eventually. i wish i had some homemade maple syrup to reward it with.

boxelder (maple) seeds in late winter

 

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bine vs vine

bine vs vine

if you’re a nature geek, you might know that a vine climbs via tendrils and a bine climbs by growing in a helix around the object it climbs. i’m trying to decide whether as a spouse i am a vine or a bine. there’s something a little grabby about a vine. i think i’d rather be a bine–intertwined, but not grasping. embracing but ultimately independent.

unidentified bine

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eat your greens, eat your beans

eat your greens eat your beans

yesterday i read an article by mark bittman, a cookbook author and former new york times columnist. it was one of the saner discussions of what to eat and what not to eat that i’ve read in a long time. probably since the last time i read michael pollan. the summary is that eating well is not complicated though the food industry and processed food marketers have made it so. eat mostly plant based whole foods. eat widely. eat joyfully. avoid processed food as much as possible. don’t pay attention to diets or fads. be reasonably active. get on with your life. live long.

assorted spring salad greens

  • John Forsman says:

    Just a little advice, I was a food photographer for over 25 years, the greens look wilted and dry. Food is difficult, the photographer must be ready when the subject is. Ice cream is more difficult than salad. Rack of Lamb more difficult, monotone brown, not attractive. A small spritzer is a handy tool.

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prickly embrace

prickly embrace

get on over here. look me in the eyes for a while. lean into me. i know you’ve got sharp edges. they don’t scare me. lean in. this isn’t some flirty high school thing. this is for life.

agave

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